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  #1  
Old 01-22-2007, 06:05 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Well, I'm going to post something to get this going.
Down here (NZ) we've been on summer holidays, though I've been back at work for about a week. I teach at a pretty tough school and I'm the music teacher (head of music, but official title is 'Assistant HOF Arts'). The students don't return until Feb 7th., but there's lots to do and I've just been asked to help sort out another school's music department.
I started playing double bass in 1976, having done an honours degree in composition (with violin performance). I've played a lot of jazz, but my background was originally classical. Probably the highlight of my jazz career was doing a short tour with Gordon Brisker (USA).
He said to me,
"I really like your swing feel". This is probably the best (I've not had many) compliment that I've ever received.
I don't get a lot of contact with other DB players in my area, so sights like this are a mine of information.
For about the last 3 years I've been working on a solo DB repertoire which is sort of jazz based with a tinge of classical and world music. It's all arco.
I changed to German bow about 2 - 3 years ago after injuring the first finger on my right hand.
The guy who built my German frog did it a funny shape, so my bow is a bit different from the standard... the bottom of the frog is flush with the hair. I'd love to find out about more this type of frog design. I have stuck with this frog because I can't really afford to replace it ($600NZ + rehair), but I feel pretty happy with it.
I also play BG.
I'm 54 years old and have two children in their 20's. I've been married for nearly 23 years.
Why am I telling you all this?
Well, when you see a post by me, you'll know a bit about who I am.
Sometimes I make silly posts (especially after a glass of vino or 2), but I always strive to treat everybody with respect.
Bass is huge in my life. Sometimes I think that I should spend more time thinking about something like sex and less about bass.
Ah, but you can't teach an old dog new tricks!
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  #2  
Old 01-22-2007, 09:32 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Still only me here!
...well, I'll carry on...
Wainuiomata is a settlement that is separated from two cities
(Lower Hutt - boring, and Wellington - interesting) by a rather big hill. Apart from Upper Hutt (a hole) it contains the cheapest houses that you can find anywhere near Wellington.
This is why I live here. It does, however, have some wonderful native bush nearby. At night and in the early morning one can hear the calls of native birds and native V8 cars. Yes, unfortunately some Wainuiomatians seem to love burning the treads off their tyres. This is good for the guy who owns the local tyre shop.

At the Southern end of Wainuiomata is a small settlement of shops known as the Homedale Village. Today, when I was out walking, I met up with the chap who owns the small children's bookshop in the village. He wants to run a small jazz festival and I have agreed to help him. I once ran part of a large festival in Tauranga, so I have a bit of experience.
We'll get the nearby secondary schools involved and I'll try to call in a few favours from some Wellington jazz musicians whom I know.
If nobody agrees to play, I do have my 1 hour 20 minutes (and growing) solo arco double bass repertoire to fall back on.

Maybe one of you hot yankee bass players wants to do a free gig in Wainuiomata? Unfortunately you'll have to pay your own airfare, but you could stay at my place and experience the sort of hospitality that you only get in Wainuiomata!
And I can promise you top billing!

Bored in New York? Had enough of Philadolphia? Too much rushing around in Los Angeles?
Why not take a break beneath the lovely hills of Wainuiomata, where a toob is called a tube and tomato sauce ain't called ketchup?
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Old 01-22-2007, 11:25 PM
Greg Clinkingbeard Greg Clinkingbeard is offline
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It's all so very tempting. I've got about five minutes of arco repertoire that I can offer.
The way you describe your home makes me envious; sounds like a nice place to live.

A little about me,

I live in a typical middle income suburb in Kansas City with my wife Diann. I have a daughter attending college in Virginia and a son here in high school. Both are musicians, violin and cello. We share our home with three cats and a dog.

My musical training, if you can call it that, began in grade school. I played alto sax throughout middle and high school. Guitar lessons began when I was about twelve or thirteen, but I soon found the bass. It just seemed to fit me better. My high school had a blonde Kay that found me. I played it the best I could in the pit orchestra for school musicals and a little jazz. Unfortunately, I couldn't find a teacher in town but I did the best I could.

In college, I studied music for two years and studied the DB with a member of the Kansas City Symphony. I played a bass provided by my college......a blonde Kay. The bass had some horrible roundwound strings on it. I think the E and A were steel and the D and G may have been nylon? All I remember for sure is that I had to work so hard on that bass to get anything out of it. It was a lot of work.
The slab was my main interest and I did a lot of gigging with everything from Country to Jazz groups.

Well, after graduating college I got a sales job and began a career and family. Music began to take a back seat and I eventually quit playing altogether. Twenty years later.......................... how do you play this thing?????

I've had my DB now for a little less than a year and am studying with one of the top Jazz players in the area. I'm good enough now that I'm playing semi regularly and don't usually stink it up too bad. My main problem is just re-learning all those tunes.

Having the time of my life with a woman who supports me completely. It doesn't get any better.
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Old 01-22-2007, 11:54 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Hey, Greg.
Maybe I'm getting old, but it fasinates me how two guys can chat across the world. I loved hearing your experiences. I remember, as a youngster, playing a bass with big, fat gut strings... and trying to bow them with a bow that desperately needed rosin.
I hope your family are all well and safe.
Good luck with that playing.
Richard
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Old 01-23-2007, 01:33 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Well, it's morning 'down here' and I'm off to work today. I don't mean to go on about my '78 Fender Jazz because, after all, this is a Ken Smith site, but...
I had a practice with a covers band last night. I've had my FJ tuned as a tenor bass for many years as it is great for solo playing. A couple of days ago I slapped some GHS strings on it that I had in my drawer. Wow! This bass has such a big sound! I'd forgotten how big, as the tenor strings are thinner and don't have that bottom end. Now, the sort of stuff that this band plays (Classic Rock) is definately not my bag and I'm only filling in to help out a friend. But last night I came home beaming because that bass was just so much fun to play! I kept turning down all night because it seemed to be cutting right through the entire band. I am not a loud player.

On another note, don't forget that the Homedale Village Jazz Festival (Wainuiomata) is coming up sometime between June and August. The offer of free accomodation still stands for any passing yankee bass player who wants to play free and top the bill. I'm sure I can round up a few competent jazz musicians. If you haven't had the New Zealand experience, here's a chance and a reason to come.

Remember Lord of the Rings and those amazing castles? All done on computer, unfortunately. But NZ is a nice place to visit, providing you stay away from the ozone hole. The tourism board always claims that we're 'clean and green'. We'll I suppose it's true, but there is litter here too. There are some very good jazz musicians in Wellington (30 min. away by car). The NZSO (symphony orchestra) is certainly worth a listen too.

That's all from 'down under' this morning.
Today's the day I practise my major scales on my DB, so I'd better get into it.
Ciao. A piu tardi.
Remember: Italian is the language of music.
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  #6  
Old 01-23-2007, 11:11 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Yes, Italian sure is the language of music.
French, they say, is the language of love.
Madigascan is probably the language of something, maybe it's the language of motor mechanics?
Without pushing the point too hard, maybe Western Zulu is the language of hair dressing.
What about American? Well, it's really just English with some words spelt wrong and some 'interesting' grammar. It's a good guess that English originated in England. Just like Spanish originated in Spain and Latin originated in Lat. (a little joke there)
Why did the Americans decide to tamper with English?
They spell 'colour' as color and 'realise' as realize. They ignore the verbal form of practice (to practise) and leave 'me' out of programme.
I suppose life is about change. Everything changes. Like jazz and views on moral issues.
Down under we speak what is referred to as 'the Queen's English'. I guess if the queen says something it's okay. Maybe Americans speak 'the President's English'.
I wonder if our attitudes to language effect how we play music?
It does effect how singers sound. Imagine Bessie Smith singing the Queen's English.

This time of the year lawns grow very fast down under.
I need to mow mine. I'm a bit tired because I had a long day at work. If I mow the lawns, I might be too tired to do further double bass practice tonight because I may fall victim to 'a few wines'. I will do the lawns and attempt to practise. God bless you America!
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Old 01-23-2007, 11:31 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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A few minutes later...
Went outside, put on gum boots, it started to rain.
Started to rain 'cats and dogs'.
I know because I got hit by a bone!
I exaggerate. It started to spit.
This is the way down under. Little things can stop big things happening.
Wife home soon.
Will see uncut lawns.
Funny how she never says,
"I hope you've done those diminished scales today."
Yes, little things sure can stop big things happening.
Apologies, I got a bit deep there.

Wife home very soon now.
No tea prepared. No lawns cut. Other household jobs still needing attention.
Me off.
Bad English me know.
Me don't care.
Wife will, but not about English.
Crickey!
ciao...
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Old 01-23-2007, 11:34 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Oooooooooooooooooooooh!
Wife home now!
Big trouble!
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  #9  
Old 01-24-2007, 12:06 AM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Is there anyone out there?
Almost sounds like a Shirley Bassey song.
Ah, she's great!
I'm going to try all the smiley faces on Ken's site... (the program(me) wouldn't let me).
Why is the puzzled guy blue?
Obviously the mad guy has to be red.
Does the guy with big teeth have to be green?
Why has the puzzled guy got three question marks above him, but the yellow happy guy has no explanation marks?
Maybe he's not really happy, but a bit depressed and on medication.
This affects you when you use this little yellow guy to show you're happy,
because people like me might suspect that you're on something!
Maybe you'd be safer to use the pinky-white guy with his tongue hanging out. But, there again, is the hanging tongue symbolic of something so deep that even I don't see its significance?
Well, you see, that guy helped calm the moment.
nah, I'm not really angry.
well, my teeth are yellow, maybe I should've used the yellow guy.
cool guy with deformed mouth.
Blue guy with little TV inserted in eye socket.
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Old 01-24-2007, 03:33 AM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Sun's gone down now in Wainuiomata.
9pm.
My wife . Shelley, wants to watch a classic movie called "The Glass Menagerie".
For those of you who don't know, 'menagerie' is to do with the age of men... MEN-AGE-RIE.
Suprisingly, the "RIE" part on the end is the important part.
You yankee guys up north have probably heard of 'whisky and rye'.
Well, 'rie' is an old English spelling for the same crop. It works in the same way as how ketchup is really tomato sauce.
Well, it really bugs me that people can reduce TS to a name like 'ketchup', because there may be an obscure language, somewhere in the world, where ketchup means something really volgar. But, that's a story for another time.
So there is a glass thing in this story where men get older by eating a crop.
This is why I refuse to watch women's movies. They make no sense.

I didn't practise tonight.

I did listen to Edgar Meyer (and friends) though. Wonderful! It is a still, hot and misty night in Wainuiomata. (You see the importance of correct English grammar... I don't mean that it continued to be hot and misty, but that the night had a 'still' quality.) My wife said it reminded her of Scotland. I thought of Mel Gibson in Braveheart when she said that. Of course, Mel's really an Aussie. Aussies say 'mate' all the time.
"Gidday mate! Great game of footy tonight, mate."
Not very Scottish. It killed the moment. Boy, do I need to use one of those little faces that Ken supplies!

Sometimes I get Mel Gibson and Russell Crowe mixed up a bit.
Russell is a kiwi from down under who sometimes claims to be Aussie.
I think that's like claiming to be from Kansas if you're Canadian..
If you were in England that would be like claiming to be Welsh.
Ah, the Welsh! Once one of the great rugby nations with heroes like Barry John and J.J. Williams. But, no more.
Rugby's easy beats... in the same class as the US Eagles.
But, to give credit where it's due, the USA are the champions of Gridiron.
Only problem is that no other country plays it.
Well, maybe Zambia does.
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Old 01-24-2007, 03:51 AM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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I love Italian.
I haven't travelled much.
I've been to Australia, but that's the sort of thing you generally keep to yourself.
I've never been anywhere near Italy, but I know it would be great.
I'm so convinced that I've actually spent years trying to learn Italian.
I am really good at swearing in Italian and can probably slip words through here without having to use symbols to replace letters, for example, ca#$o! But that's a bit childish.
Did you know, for example, that 'forte' actually means strong and not 'loud'. Evidently Italian women sometimes call it out during sex.
It would make no sense if they were exclamating,
"Loud! Loud!"
When I was a child I loved the whole idea of Roman soldiers and often would play at being one. Maybe I was in a previous life, like Russell Crowe!
I can't see myself with a grand name like 'Maximus' though.
Maybe 'Mediumus' would be more honest.
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Old 01-24-2007, 04:17 AM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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So why, I hear you say, is 'down under' so important?
After all, there's no thread called 'up over'.

Think of it like this.
We are like the missing part of a bigger picture.
"But", I hear you say, "You're down there and not really missing!"

In reply I say:
What would Ken Smith basses be if he had been born Kevin Ferdinham Christiansen?
For a start, how would that look on a bass?
(Too long to fit on the head stock?)
Would it have to be abbreviated to KFC?
I see a copyright problem there.

That's basically how Down Under supports the rest of the world. We're basically quiet and, perhaps, a little dim witted. We don't get in the way, but we help to fill up that bit called the South Pacific... good to have some spots on the map to make it more interesting.
Our countries are small and pose no real threat to anyone else's lifestyle, except for Australia but they're too busy surfing and saying 'mate'.

Time to use a Ken Smith face .
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Old 01-24-2007, 09:30 AM
Daniel Yeabsley Daniel Yeabsley is offline
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Hi Richard, just thought i'd post a quick thought from Newtown (1 hour from Wainuiomata).

It's still and quiet here too, 3 in the morning, just finished a gig (alto sax not DB). But I'm looking forward to playing my DB tomorrow with the Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra at the Botanical Gardens.

Come along if you're in the neighbourhood, we start at 8.

ps- I don't mow the lawns either.
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Old 01-24-2007, 02:43 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Yeabsley View Post
Hi Richard, just thought i'd post a quick thought from Newtown (1 hour from Wainuiomata).

It's still and quiet here too, 3 in the morning, just finished a gig (alto sax not DB). But I'm looking forward to playing my DB tomorrow with the Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra at the Botanical Gardens.

Come along if you're in the neighbourhood, we start at 8.

ps- I don't mow the lawns either.
Hi Daniel,
Ah, the ukulele orchestra!
My wife is in love with the Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra!
Unfortunately I have a practice with a Wainui covers band tonight, but I have to catch that orchestra! I'd love to see you play bass some time too.
By the way, I can get to Newtown in about 40 minutes, and I'm a slow driver.
All the best for the gig tonight Daniel... wish I could be there.
Richard
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Old 01-24-2007, 02:56 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Here's a true story from down under.
In the 1960's in Wellington (NZ) there was a very popular cake shop on the Lambton Quay end of Willis Street that was called the 'K K K'.
This is true.
My mother loved it and always shopped there.
It had no connection with the Klu Klux Klan, I assure you. I guess that in the 1960's New Zealand was a bit closed off from what was happening in the rest of the world. 'K K K' was an abreviation of 'Kottage Kake Kitchen' and I bet the owner was sure that he had come up with something 'Katchy' and totally original.
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Old 01-24-2007, 03:21 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Ah, wasn't it nice to hear from Daniel a few posts up. My wife loves his Ukulele Orchestra so I'm sure that she thinks Daniel is really cool.
I'm moving a bit slowly this morning, although I wasn't up at 3am like Daniel. I had a few wines and didn't sleep too well. I've got a very early start tomorrow. My 20 year old son is having his tonsils out and he has to be at a Hospital in Newtown (where Daniel lives) before about 7.30am.
My son, George, plays bass guitar in Heavy Metal bands. He has very fast fingers, but I'd love to see him work on some more theory. He played in a very good school big band in Tauranga, where we used to live, so he's had other musical experiences. He also did a 6 month jazz course at Massey University.
The covers band I'm filling in with are playing at a 21st. on Friday night... a freebo, as they all seem to be. Still, it's a chance to crank up the old jazz bass. The drummer speeds up a lot so, last practice, I tried to introduce the concept of time. The band seemed interested. I'm not being high and mighty, just trying to help some guys with less experience. Personally, I've always had a bit of a speeding up problem. As you get older you get to understand that time and intonation are everything. It was Jaco who said, "Women, children and rhythm sections first". I think he had the same thing in mind.

9.20am. Late for work. Lots to do.
Ciao.
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Old 01-24-2007, 06:16 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Just added Ken's Corner to my work computer (favourites list). I'm writing from work at this moment.
Gosh there are lots of corners belonging to different Kens on the internet.
One sounded church based, another like a library and another, I think, was something to do with fishing. The list went on and on.
I wonder how many corners there are? Bearing in mind that the average simple room has four corners, how many rooms would all the Ken's Corners add up to? How many houses, for that matter?
I'm not much good with computers, but maybe someone out there is and knows a way to count the corners.
Maybe this sight should more accurately be called 'A Ken's Corner', or 'Ken's Corner 46', or 'Ken, the luthier and bass player's Corner that has nothing much to do with fishing, religious causes or general reading'.

I wonder if all the Kens with corners will ever get together to make one big Kens' Corner? It could be the biggest site on the internet.

Back to work.
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Old 01-24-2007, 11:27 PM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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5.09pm.
Somewhere in Wainuiomata.
Near Lower Hutt and not far from Wellington.
New Zealand.
Down Under.
We'll be having sausages for tea tonight.
Precooked 'Spicy Italian' with frogen veg and potatoes baked in their jackets.
This could probably be happening anywhere in the world.
Probably safe to rule out the North Pole, most deserts and Afghanistan.
Well, the frozen veg would be a problem in the desert, okay at the North Pole though.
So, what makes this repast of 'Spicy Italian' sausages, frozen veg and potatoes baked in their jackets so different? So special?
Well, they are being cooked by a double bass player.
Someone who knows the way of the bow.
Someone who carries the form of a Bb blues somewhere deep within his bones.
This will be no ordinary meal. No sir!
This meal will be in Ab minor.
Not a comfortable key on the double bass, compared to, say, G major.
This meal will have so many flats that I chill to think what they are.
Some people would say,
"Just think of it as the relative minor of B major."
Well, I hate G# minor.
It's evil.
Even Death Metal players avoid it.
Even folk guitarists with capos. (Should that be 'capi'?)
Even the Jaoomboo tribe of Central Africa have no words in their language to describe the combination of notes that G# minor produces.

God! You guys have spoilt my night!
I was going to cook a nice simple tea, but now I'm angry!

Thank heavens for Ken's little faces!
Now I feel better... and my tounge is hanging out like a dog's.
In China someone is probably having dog for tea. The little purple guy doesn't know what to do.
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Old 01-25-2007, 01:50 AM
Richard Prowse Richard Prowse is offline
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Covers band rehearsal cancelled at last moment.
Too late to catch Ukulele Orchestra.
Will have to watch a 'chick flick' with wife.
Let's pick a 'Ken' face that best illustrates this...
well, this little purple chap seems happy, but what is really going on inside his head?
I play for free, the band sucks. The sax player (an old friend) sounds like a whale giving birth. Why must he always play the root notes on I IV V tunes?
It sounds like " hurn, hurn, hurn" to me.
The best Ken face to describe the sax playing is probably the guy with the little TV in his eye socket.
Or should I have used the Christian looking guy?
Or the green oriental?
The smiling guy who's had half his mouth surgically sewn up might have worked too.
But, what's he thinking under the shades?

Why do Christians always look so smug?
I was brought up a Christian and I don't mean to offend, but...
every time I get into a discussion with a Christian, they always seem to adopt the premise that their position is beyond question because they are right and everybody else is wrong.
Maybe they are.
But what about Muslims and Hindus? Did they miss the point? Or the Aboriginals of Australia who have been around for a trillion years, even before Star Wars?
Is God (if he exists) taking the piss out of these millions of people?
I think Mel Gibson started life as an Aboriginal because he seems very wise, though not quite so much as Russell Crowe when he was Maximus.
I hope the people in Hollywood get onto Gladiator II very soon.
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Old 01-25-2007, 01:59 AM
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Ken Smith Ken Smith is offline
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#1) Please keep religion OUT of your posts, We do not want to stir anything up.

#2) WHO are you talking to? Usually in a Forum a person makes a statement or asks a question. THEN, he/you should wait for a reply.

Seems to me like you are writing an on-line book about your daily life. Will this go 30-50 posts a month of just you talking to yourself?

Please go back if you can and try using the edit button to clean up your posts just a little.. please, thx.
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