Ken's Corner (Bass Forums Sponsored By KSB)

Go Back   Ken's Corner (Bass Forums Sponsored By KSB) > Double Basses > Music [DB] > Classical and Symphony Bass Playing

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-01-2007, 12:48 PM
Jeff Moote's Avatar
Jeff Moote Jeff Moote is offline
Posting Member
 
Join Date: 07-03-2007
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Posts: 47
Jeff Moote is on a distinguished road
Send a message via MSN to Jeff Moote
Default Solo repertoire (Concertos, Sonatas and more)

What has everyone played? What's your favourite? I'm thinking we'll leave orchestral solos out (Mahler, Pulcinella, etc.) perhaps for another thread.


I'm just beginning my journey into the solo rep as I'm finally going to have a teacher again (after about 6 months without). I'm starting with the usual baroque sonatas (Marcello, Vivaldi, Eccles) and have also committed myself to playing the Vanhal for a Concerto Competition (with the orchestra I play in) to be held in January. If that sounds ambitious, it is! I think I'm crazy, but the desire not to embarrass myself at the competition should be good incentive to practice
__________________
-Jeff

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-01-2007, 07:02 PM
Charles Federle Charles Federle is offline
Junior Posting Member
 
Join Date: 07-25-2007
Location: Denton, Texas
Posts: 28
Charles Federle is on a distinguished road
Default

The Vanhal is a great piece and it is hard, but have fun with it and I wish you all the best luck. It is one of our best classical concertos. If you are just getting into solo work I suggest the Scarlatti Sonatas over the Marcello and Vivaldi. Abit easier to get into and still good music.

Instead of a list of what I have played I will just say that the Bruch Kol Nidre is one of my favorite times when playing with an orchestra, and the Misek Sonata in e minor ( I think that is the right key) is one of my all time favorite pieces to perform. Even if I can barely make it through.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-01-2007, 08:50 PM
Jeff Moote's Avatar
Jeff Moote Jeff Moote is offline
Posting Member
 
Join Date: 07-03-2007
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Posts: 47
Jeff Moote is on a distinguished road
Send a message via MSN to Jeff Moote
Default

Thanks for the suggestions. I've made two big orders of music from Lemur in the last couple weeks, but if I'm in a local shop or placing another order I'll pick up the Scarlatti sonatas and perhaps the 3 by Misek too (for playing later when I'm ready for them). On the "difficulty scale" used in the Lemur catalogue, the Marcello and Vivaldi sonatas are 3.0-4.0, the Vanhal at 6.0 and the Misek E minor 8.8. His first sonata isn't quite as bad, and they give it a 6.5.

As for the Vanhal, my biggest challenge initially is editing the parts. I want to read it at pitch in Dmaj so I had to buy both the Dmaj and Emaj editions as there is no orchestral tuning version. So I'll use the solo part from Emaj (reading D) and the piano part from Dmaj. The problem is that the Dmaj edition (reading C) is actually much better edited and includes the facsimile. The part I want to play from has changed phrasing, left out some ornaments, and very liberally taken passages down an octave (though from looking at the facsimile, Vanhal wrote many parts that nobody plays at pitch). I figure I'll try it all as the editor has written it, but make notes where I may wish to take things up an octave or two if I'm capable.
__________________
-Jeff


Last edited by Jeff Moote; 08-01-2007 at 10:14 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-01-2007, 10:01 PM
Charles Federle Charles Federle is offline
Junior Posting Member
 
Join Date: 07-25-2007
Location: Denton, Texas
Posts: 28
Charles Federle is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Moote View Post
On the "difficulty scale" used in the Lemur catalogue, the Marcello and Vivaldi sonatas are 3.0-4.0, the Vanhal at 6.0 and the Misek E minor 8.8. His first concerto isn't quite as bad, and they give it a 6.5.
There is a Misek concerto ?

As for the difficulty rating... well I am not sure I personally agree with them. I put the Vanhal and most of those cello sonatas as a bit harder, but that might just be me personally.

Something to remember when dealing with our older concertos though is that they really are transcriptions almost. They were for a bass tuned much differently then what we use today (Viennese tuning). To get an idea of how different things were search youtube and you will find someone playing the Vanhal there in Viennese tuning. With that said the part written in D might be more authentic. I have never done much study with the manuscript, but you should feel free to add a few ornaments or change octaves if you feel it works better musically.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-01-2007, 10:23 PM
Jeff Moote's Avatar
Jeff Moote Jeff Moote is offline
Posting Member
 
Join Date: 07-03-2007
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Posts: 47
Jeff Moote is on a distinguished road
Send a message via MSN to Jeff Moote
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Federle View Post
There is a Misek concerto ?
Mental slip - I meant sonata and have corrected the above. There's three sonatas I can find (Op. 5, 6, 7) from Misek.

Quote:
Something to remember when dealing with our older concertos though is that they really are transcriptions almost. They were for a bass tuned much differently then what we use today (Viennese tuning). To get an idea of how different things were search youtube and you will find someone playing the Vanhal there in Viennese tuning. With that said the part written in D might be more authentic. I have never done much study with the manuscript, but you should feel free to add a few ornaments or change octaves if you feel it works better musically.
Yes, I'm aware it was written for Viennese tuning (A-D-F#-A) though it was orchestrated for a scordatura tuning of a semitone making the original concert key Eb though the bass read in D). I've seen the clip on YouTube and it certainly does look a lot easier in some passages (such as Dmaj arpeggios - just use the octave harmonic of the top 3 strings!). I'll be playing it tuned in fifths (C-G-D-A) so I have the advantage in some passages of the harmonics of the top two strings, but double stopping all the seconds and thirds in the cadenza could be annoying.

I am approaching it much like a transcription and will keep an eye to the manuscript as well. I'll learn my way around the notes according to the editors version, and like you said do any octave transposition or additional ornaments as I feel appropriate with the manuscript as a guideline. What is it with composers and terrible musical penmanship anyway?

Thanks again for the input!
__________________
-Jeff


Last edited by Jeff Moote; 08-01-2007 at 11:47 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-02-2007, 06:00 PM
Brian Ross
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vanhal facsimile?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Moote View Post
....The problem is that the Dmaj edition (reading C) is actually much better edited and includes the facsimile...
I really like the Vanhal - my favorite classical period concerto. Which edition is it that has the facsimile? I'd really like to see that. I've played one written in D major for the bass (Hofmeister I think) and I'm very very suspicious of the editing.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-02-2007, 07:32 PM
Jeff Moote's Avatar
Jeff Moote Jeff Moote is offline
Posting Member
 
Join Date: 07-03-2007
Location: Waterloo, ON, Canada
Posts: 47
Jeff Moote is on a distinguished road
Send a message via MSN to Jeff Moote
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Roessler View Post
I really like the Vanhal - my favorite classical period concerto. Which edition is it that has the facsimile? I'd really like to see that. I've played one written in D major for the bass (Hofmeister I think) and I'm very very suspicious of the editing.
Both of mine are published by Hofmeister but the editors are different. The piano reductions are quite different too, aside from the key change, but this doesn't really matter much if your end goal is to play it with an orchestra since they're both reductions.

The one that sounds in D with solo tuning (bass part in C) is the one that included the facsimile (which is in D), revealing that both versions have suspect editing but the one you have completely leaves some ornament notes out. I've gone through and fixed it all, including lots of 8va (whole pages as well as isolated passages) but we'll see if I can actually play all of them in the upper octave (lots of work at the end of the fingerboard in TP). If you want to PM me your email address, I'll try to scan the facsimile this weekend and will send it to you. From there you can make your own decisions about editing your part.
__________________
-Jeff


Last edited by Jeff Moote; 08-02-2007 at 09:05 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-09-2007, 08:58 PM
stan haskins stan haskins is offline
Senior Posting Member
 
Join Date: 01-22-2007
Location: Orange County, NY
Posts: 233
stan haskins is on a distinguished road
Default Concertos

I like playing the Koussevitsky the most, probably only because I put so much work into it - I recently backpedalled and started checking out the Cappuzi (sp?)
__________________
A is A
http://gluedtothestring.blogspot.com
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-24-2007, 09:02 PM
Andrew Festa Andrew Festa is offline
Junior Posting Member
 
Join Date: 02-04-2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 9
Andrew Festa is on a distinguished road
Default

I really love the Vanhal Concerto. It's probably my favorite bass concerto.

Some other solo pieces I've done are the Koussevitzky short pieces-They are really fun to play, and not too difficult. The Andante from the short pieces is my favorite out of the four. It’s very beautiful.

Dittersdorf Concerto-I played it in C sounding in D major. It was published by Hoffmeister and came with cadenzas by Miloslav Gadjos. The first movement cadenza that Gadjos wrote is really fun, and the audience loved it at a performance I played it at. I like the edition reading in C better than reading it in D. It makes a lot of the passages easier, but some of the harmonics don’t work, so they have to be transposed down, which I still think sounds fine.

J.C Bach Adagio-This piece is arranged from a Viola Concerto. It's very beautiful and fun to play. It has some difficult passages, but nothing too bad. There’s a great recording out by David Grossman.

Recently, just for fun I started on Sperger's 2nd Concerto in D major. It's published by Hoffmeister. So far it's not too bad. There are a lot of scalular passages, and lots of arpeggios. The cadenzas for this edition were also written by Miloslav Gadjos, but I haven't made it that far yet. Difficulty wise I'd say it's comparable to the Vanhal.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-15-2008, 08:13 PM
Charles Stark Charles Stark is offline
Senior Posting Member
 
Join Date: 01-12-2008
Location: .
Posts: 275
Charles Stark is on a distinguished road
Default

Here's my recital repertoire for April:

1. Bach, J.C - Adagio from the Viola Concerto
2. Dragonetti, Domenico - Concerto
3. Bruch, Max - Kol Nidrei
4. Berio, Luciano - Psy

I love the Vanhal but my teacher suggested I have some "fun" this spring playing the Dragonetti.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-12-2009, 05:23 AM
Joel Larsson Joel Larsson is offline
Senior Posting Member
 
Join Date: 02-10-2009
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Posts: 413
Joel Larsson is on a distinguished road
Default

Dragonetti sure is fun! It looks difficult to the audience but you can practically play it in 180bpm and still manage because it is so well written for the instrument. Too bad it was written by Nanny, though... that sort of makes it less interesting.

Yes, Vanhal is great. All those different scoraduras and editions makes it confusing, though... as for that "solo Viennese" tuning in an open Eb chord. The first Dittersdorf concerto is available in at least two editions, one that reads Eb, and one that reads D. I believe the D version is easier to play, but how are you supposed to know beforehand? Another problem arises with his 2nd, which is a standard piece for European auditions. It was written in D, but on the fourth tuned bass some passages got so difficult that the person first editing the piece cut out some out!! How nice is that to the composer? Now, it is easier to play in C, but nobody can really do that, since it's the edited D version that's already been standard for a good many years, and that's what you play for the auditions. Gee.

Anyways, my absolute faves are Tubin's concerto, and Rota's "Divertimento Concertante." Edicson Ruiz has nice versions on Youtube, especially his Rota is awesome. I have vowed not to stop studying until I can play it properly.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2007 - Ken Smith Basses, LTD. (All Rights Reserved)