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  #1  
Old 01-19-2007, 10:19 PM
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Lightbulb History of the American Bass

I authored a thread on ‘talkbass.com’ in November of 2005 on Yankee Basses and it grew to over 400 posts in about a year. It was the first time on-line where Bassist and Luthiers came together to pool their resources and knowledge. I think this was a thread where everyone had something to learn. Rather that copy 21 pages containing over 400 posts from TalkBass I will just re-cap some of the highlights that I posted personally. I don’t feel good about copying materials from others over there that might have some copyright coverage as well.

Please feel free to jump in and post your Yankee Basses once again and add it to the Smith Forum. I assure you that it will not end up in some archive section! Relevant questions and comments are welcomed as well here.
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  #2  
Old 01-19-2007, 10:21 PM
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Lightbulb History of the American Bass (2)

I have now owned 2 old Yankee Basses and one new one as well as an old English Bass that was restored in 19th century New England. I have great respect for these Bass Pioneers. Both of my older Basses are from the Prescott School. One is by A. Batchelder & Son, 1875 and the other a 7/8 Prescott c.1820 which I sold in 2006.

I have seen many Yankee Basses at other shops both pictured and in person. Some of them have replaced Scrolls and a few Basses I have seen have old Yankee type Scrolls but look to be European made Basses that were repaired here. When I was a young Bassist 35 years ago the only American Bass mentioned was Prescott. Since I started looking closely at this in the last few years it is clear to me that the Prescott name has been used much too often in naming an olde Yankee. Even Basses owned by famous players that I have seen I have to be honest with my opinions and say Prescott ‘School’ but ‘not’ a Prescott. Prescott was not the first maker of Bass instruments but his output and success made him the most prolific Yankee maker. Let's 'hunt' those Yankee Basses down and get them cataloged up here.......

All of my Basses can be found here regardless if they have been sold already; http://www.kensmithbasses.com/Double...ble_basses.htm

These are some of the names that popped up on the TB thread I started; Prescott, Dearborn, Bates, J.B. Allen, Tewksbury..And Prescott attributed Basses owned by Scott Lafaro and Reggie Workman that have different FFs ad Scrolls than the other Prescotts we have seen.

Also, George and August Gemunder who moved here from Europe and settled in NY after starting out in Mass. as well as Czech born Joseph Bohmann who set-up shop in Chicago around 1888.

Yankee Bass owners & fans, Speak out!



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Old 01-19-2007, 10:23 PM
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Lightbulb History of the American Bass (3)

Not all made Basses. Many made just Church Basses and most made only Violins.

I have a fairly large book by Wenberg on American makers. Again, it's mostly Violins but there are 'mentions' only about some that made Basses. "The Violin Makers of the United States
by Thomas James Wenberg, Mount Hood Publishing Company, 1986."


I have read a story about the Smithsonian claiming Prescott made only 12 of the 7/8ths Basses but that does not make sense to me. Prescott made 207 Double Basses not counting the 500 or so Church Basses. I would assume that most were 7/8ths, some 4/4 and 3/4 sizes. Maybe the 5/4, 7.5ft Basses as Elgar refers to is what the Smithsonian is referring to.

I have also read that they made them 3-string as it was to be plain and conservative as the 4-String was new in much of Europe at that time and England was the last to go to 4-strings. New Englanders being mostly of English decent viewed the Bass as a 3-string instrument for traditional purposes.

My Batchelder from New Hampshire was made in 1875 as a 4-string. This shows that most of the 19th century stayed 3-string in NE.

Arnold Schnitzer and Robbie MacIntosh were looking over my Prescott when Robbie pointed out some faint Purfling left in around the C-bout edges.. What does this mean? This large 7/8 Prescott was cut down from a 4/4 size to its present shape. The Purfling Loop on the Neck Button did make us think it was cut but we didn't see any other clues at that time so we dismissed the idea until now.

I have seen a picture of a Church bass with an Oak or Ash Scroll on line. Also, my Batchelder has a quarter sawn White Pine Back so I would venture to say that early makers in New England used local woods on occassion that was less than traditional for string instruments.
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Old 01-19-2007, 10:24 PM
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Prescott Scrolls

In an article I read It was believed that Prescott copied an old English Scroll for his model. I don't know if they are referring to Basses or Gambas on this one. I have seen other American Scrolls with carvings as well. Some have 4 and even 6 turns at the Head. I have seen Italians with an extra turn but never with 6. This seems to be mostly early American. Prescotts Scrolls vary from period to period but they are always the same idea. Scrolls are carved in at the top with inlaid plates for all that I have seen. FF holes are wide and short looking and usually upright but some have a bit of slant. Most that are un-altered are attached to the top at the ends.

I see the most variation on the neck block and back construction. Some backs are double thickness with the ribs bent around them using the back lip channel as the bending form. My Batchelder is made that way. Some have neck blocks that from the outside seem to be the original design while many others have raised upper ribs at the neck suggesting they were made 'blockless'. Ofcourse these have been 'blocked' at the first chance during its earliest restoration. My Prescott was cut down and the original Purfling only shows in the corners and the 'button' area. We will try to figure out what shape and size this was originally if at all possible once the top is off. Many Prescotts were made with the Ribs ‘inserted’ into the Top and Back plates like a Yankee Furniture Drawers.

The other thing that varies with these Basses are the sizes he made as well as design. Gamba and Busetto were made as well as two different Block/less designs. I have seen a 3/4 Gamba the huge ones on line over 7ft Tall and the cut versions like mine. I would guess he made mostly 7/8-4/4 sizes with some 3/4 and some 5/4 models over his life span.

The 5-string Gagliano in the Elgar Book is now believed to be a George Panormo and was converted back to 4-strings some time ago. The Nicolo Amati (labeled) used by 'Virtuoso de Roma' on all the Vivaldi recordings of the 1950s-'60s is now attributed to CG Testori. This happens a lot with old instruments attributed to famous makers. If we never saw a JB Allen or Dearborn we would most likely call them all Prescotts. There is nothing bad here, just open minds looking for truth in Bass making history. A maker named Benjamin Willard (1805-1810) is believed to be Prescotts teacher. Recently I saw a Bass in a NY shop and thought it was a beautiful Willard only to be told it’s a Prescott. It seems that every Yankee bass wants to be the most famous regardless of fact. Regardless of who the maker is, I see the values based on the individual Basses as long as they have similar merits, Prescott or not.


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  #5  
Old 01-19-2007, 10:26 PM
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Lightbulb History of the American Bass (5)

Now, as far as Prescott restorations go, a lot of discoveries were made when mine was opened up. The Top still has some evidence left of the Bass having Rabbit joints on the Top as well as the Back where the ribs were bent around the plates instead of using a form. This Bass was reduced in size (upper shoulders and C bouts but corners all original) and must have been trimmed just inside the Purfling line and re-carved internally to even the Bass out by that Joint. This means that this is an earlier Prescott than originally thought. We originally dated it due to the Dearborn Label as maybe old stock when the Bought the Shop from Prescott in 1845 or so but now we have a different viewpoint on it's age. This also means it is a Deerfield Bass and not made in Concord. We now believe this early 4/4 cut down Prescott to be c.1820 as his later Basses also have a lighter Varnish and different construction.

Arnold also found an old repair label inside from O.H. Bryant, August 1941. Bryant was the main repairman for the Boston Symphony. He died in 1943 at the age of 70. He was 68 when he worked on this Bass.
This Prescott of mine has had many alterations. It currently has a replaced Neck (graft), Neck Block, Size totally trimmed and reduced, Bass Bar replaced (but very old), Converted from 3 to 4 strings in the latter part of the 19th century with French gears and the Upper Ribs re-bent and sloped inwards as it is evident in the lighter Varnish color of the upper Ribs.

The Cross Bars in this Bass are Pine (as is the Top) and will be replaced as they are literally falling off the Back. The Bass Bar might remain but I have to look at it along with the Graduations which are almost perfect. The Top being slightly thicker near the Bar makes me think that the person that 'might' have done a re-graduation on the Top worked around the Bar instead of removing it. This being an Early Prescott and in fantastic condition leads me to believe Prescott left the Top extra thick as it is 11mm on one spot but 7mm right next to it. Maybe it was 11mm at that point and re-graduated to 7mm as far as possible without disturbing an otherwise good Bass Bar. The Bar itself it crude according to Arnold and he may just re-shape it slightly and leave the Top as is. "Aint Broke, dont fix!".. The Bass will need a Neck-graft again to get the proper Bridge height, Neck-stand, D-stop and string length desired by today’s professional Orchestra player. A few cracks need to be glued, Blocks glued back, half edging on about 1/2 the underside of the Top and a host of other small but important details. I have asked Arnold to do***ent his work as best possible on film as this Bass IS a real Prescott and maybe one of the oldest examples of a Yankee Bass we have seen from the inside.

Pre-Restoration and Post Restoration links; http://www.kensmithbasses.com/Double...tt_preview.htm http://www.kensmithbasses.com/Double...t/Prescott.htm
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  #6  
Old 01-19-2007, 10:27 PM
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Lightbulb History of the American Bass (6)

I recently ordered some info on Prescott from the 'New Hampshire Historical Society' and just received it today. It is hand written accounting records (probably done at one time as the handwriting is identical on all pages) of all the Bass Viols from 1809 -1829 numbering 147 instruments. I believe these were both types of Bass instruments from the prices he charged.

For instance, this is how and what is written;
1. (when made) 1809 April - (when sold) 1809 Nov - Jon P. Cram M. (Price) 14""

#s 1-15 are priced from 10"" to 17"" (1809-1819 Nov.)with some @15.50
#11 had no price and says yr.1818, Doit. Crosby with no price listed.
Then after #15, #11 is listed again and says; (made) 1819, Nov (sold) 1820 Jan. Harrison Gray, 16"".

#3 of 1811 is re-entered after #43 and says who bought it first and who then bought it again in 1824 Oct. It seems to have a record of both Buyers there.

After 30 instruments made by July of 1823 he had grossed $530.50. His prices now change after #15 ($14.) as #16 is $28. and #27 and 28 are only $12.

As time goes on his prices go up to 20s and 50s. I believe this MUST be the price differences between his Church Basses and his Double Basses. In Feb of 1828, one entry is for $72.50, the highest price yet and sold to Deacon Mason. Was this his first 7ft 5/4 Busetto monster? I see one other Bass earlier for $60. That says (when made) Oct. & Nov., (sold Nov.19, 1825 to T. Thompson. Several Basses b4 and after were only $20. Some say in the Price column, 20 B.B.6. This appears first on #40 and last on #92. What could B.B.6. mean? A bank account, partner, location?

These are only legal pad sized photo copies and are not so clear. I am using a Magnifier Glass to read these for you.. And me too..lol

Some names appear many times in the sold list. One of interest is Henry Prentiss who himself was a Violin Maker in Mass. at that time. He must have been a dealer for Prescott’s Basses because I see 16 of them sold to him and often several in a row. The first was #76 made March 1826 and sold Nov 1826 to Esq. Prentise and later entries all say Henry Prentise. The last on my List are #s132, 133 and 134 from July 1828. All 3 seem to be Double Basses as they are $45/2 and $50. each. Also, $16-$29 seems the low $ in that period and they must be Church Basses. It seems that Prentise bough both types of Bass from the prices show paying $25. or $50. in the same month. In the Wenberg book of American makers his name is spelled with ss at the end, Prentiss. Is this the same guy? I think so.. maybe not...lol.. Dealer? Maker?

Anyway, I wonder if my EXACT Prescott Bass is listed here. Then I would know who the first owner was. Gee, I wonder if the Warranty is transferable.. That would save me alot of money in repairs..lol
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  #7  
Old 01-19-2007, 10:29 PM
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Lightbulb History of the American Bass (7)

Bates listing!

Ok, here is what I have from the Wenberg Book of American Violin & Bow makers;

"Bates, A.B. & Co.; Fairfield, ME. Makers of double basses. Operated there c. 1843. Used cedar for the top plates."

With the location and period listed we can only assume he was influenced by Prescott. There were many workers over the years in both the Deerfield and Concord shops so we cannot rule out his possible employment or training at an earlier time. Keeping an open mind and considering the close proximity, we can consider Bates as a Prescott 'School' Bass maker. Photos pending of course.. Just to keep it honest..lol

There are a few Prescott features that would be good to date if possible. Rabbit joint/inlaid Ribs into the top and back, Blockless, No Linings, Busetto, 3/4 and large 7/8 Gambas, X-brace (not exclusively), FFs, Cello models, etc..

These features appear on various Prescott Basses. The features you see on almost all but the first few are Wide FFs attached to the Top, Flat Back, the unique long Scroll with inlaid brass plates, and 3-string. The rare early ones are huge 7/8 or small 4/4 Cello form with thin long sweeping FF holes like his Church Basses and a carved Round Back.
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Old 01-19-2007, 10:30 PM
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Lightbulb History of the American Bass (8)

Dates & Prices..
Prescott prices for the first 15 Basses from 1809 thru 1819 were $10.- $17. Who knows why the difference in Price! These must have been Church Basses and #11 of the first 15 was sold in 1818 and again in 1820. So it seems that he also took trade-ins on his own Church Basses. #3 of 1811 was bought back and sold again in 1824 for $17. the first time and $18. the second time. While the lower priced sales were under $20. The first one (Double Bass?) at $23., #16 was made and sold in April of 1820. Was this the first DoubleBass? Also, it was sold to 'Smith Batchelder'! What? I am Smith and I own a Batchelder Bass. Is this Fate or the 'TwiLight Zone'. This MUST be my calling. When MY Prescott is finished in restoration, FATE tells me I am done buying and playing other Basses. Seeing **Smith Batchelder in his record books sends CHILLS up my Spine!

** A Batchelder bass now owned by me, Ken Smith; http://www.kensmithbasses.com/Double.../batchBass.htm

In June of 1820 #18 is sold for $28. while $14. and $16. instruments are still being sold presumeably Church Basses. #55 was made march 1825 and sold in July for $50. It was bought back in october and sold for $52. He first wrote $50 and changed the '0' to a '2' as if he forgot to make a profit... The first buyer bought another Bass in Oct 1825 as well and he paid $57.50 this time. I guess he used the first Bass trade-in to pay for most and only made up the difference after Prescott sold his Bass.

My Prescott was cut down possible by Prescott because of the construction b4 the cut and at the re-build both times having the Ribs set in channels in the Top and Back. I am sure he cut down several of his Basses and helped owners trade up or dispose of Basses as needed.

In the 147 instruments made thru early 1829, there are records of 6 being bought back and sold again, #s 3,11,23, 28, 50 (sold first to the name Dearborn), and 55. The ones with lower prices I assume to be Church Basses.

Well, we need to see a 'confirmed' Tewkesbury. I mentioned Ira and Asa White and have seen a small 5/8 size Bass by them in NY. Benjamin Willard is reported to have trained Prescott but haven't seen his Double Basses but did see one I suspect. Baker of Boston I think was spotted somewhere.. and I am sure if I sit down with my American Violin Makers book, I can dig up a few more names BUT, seeing is believing.. and much much more fun..
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Old 01-19-2007, 10:31 PM
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Lightbulb History of the American Bass (9)

More Yanks..
I don't remember if these were posted before but I consider these important. Some are pre-Prescott Church Basses. Also, one of Prescotts Earliest Basses looks much cruder than we are used to seeing. I think this makes some Basses we know of difficult to date.

Benjamin Crehore (1765-1831); http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=21
http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=21
http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=21
http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=21

Benjamin Whittemore Willard,(1762–1848) reported to have taught Prescott; http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=21

Other Bass Viols (non-Prescott); http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=31
http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=21

Prescott Viols and DB; http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=31
http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=31
http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=31

When you look at the last one dated 1823 (labeled or estimated, I have no idea?) you wonder about the claims of the other Prescott Basses dated 1818-1823 that are so much more refined. It almost seems impossible for a Bass like this to be made 5 years after the large Busetto posted in the previous post.

By the way, this is where these pics came from; http://www.mfa.org/collections/searc...&coll_start=21
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Old 01-19-2007, 10:39 PM
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Lightbulb History of the American Bass (10)

Fig.8/Pattern 'D'.this is figure 8, the 'Wright' Prescott;


As you can see in his Pic as compared to mine, the upper shoulders are on the narrow side. Mine were actually much bigger before the 'Cut' so I would believe mine to be an earlier example by Prescott. The date listed as 1800 is at least 25 years too early as that is NOT the work of an 11 year old boy (Prescott born 1789) as well as that Bass looking very well developed into his style as sizing especially with the smaller trimmed/evolved upper bouts. Also, my lower bouts are 28.5" wide, uncut as the bottom is original;
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Old 01-19-2007, 10:41 PM
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Lightbulb History of the American Bass (11)

This is why I mentioned that my model is not listed in the A-D list.


Maybe mine was the 'E' model and made before he bothered with the Busetto which does have the later and lighter varnish on all that I have seen.

More here on Don Carrigan’s Prescott page; http://home.earthlink.net/~prescottviol/data/
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Old 01-26-2007, 10:27 AM
Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach is offline
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Great job, Ken. A thought occurred to me-I remember that David Bromberg had a keen interest in Yankee instruments. Was wondering if you had ever crossed paths with him in that regard?
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Old 01-26-2007, 11:33 AM
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Cool David Bromberg?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Bollbach View Post
Great job, Ken. A thought occurred to me-I remember that David Bromberg had a keen interest in Yankee instruments. Was wondering if you had ever crossed paths with him in that regard?
The Banjo guy? No, never met him. All I have to offer at the moment is the Batchelder Bass but enjoy talking about it.

On another note, over at TB, they have this thread about a restored Prescott by Lou DiLeone. It is NOT in no way a Prescott and either is Jason's Bass that he says looks like Lou's.
Everything in a Violin made near Cremona is a Strad..NOT..
Every old Bass from Milano is a Testore..NOT..
Every 19th century Bass from New England is a Prescott..NOT..

What is so hard about that. Even dealers can't get that straight. It's a shame when you look at it. There were many good Yankee Bass makers from the 19th century and we know that now. Why still is everything a Prescott?
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Old 01-28-2007, 10:49 PM
Brian Glassman Brian Glassman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Smith View Post
The Banjo guy? No, never met him. All I have to offer at the moment is the Batchelder Bass but enjoy talking about it.

On another note, over at TB, they have this thread about a restored Prescott by Lou DiLeone. It is NOT in no way a Prescott and either is Jason's Bass that he says looks like Lou's.
Everything in a Violin made near Cremona is a Strad..NOT..
Every old Bass from Milano is a Testore..NOT..
Every 19th century Bass from New England is a Prescott..NOT..

What is so hard about that. Even dealers can't get that straight. It's a shame when you look at it. There were many good Yankee Bass makers from the 19th century and we know that now. Why still is everything a Prescott?
Yeah, when I look at the restored bass by Lou DiLeone the shape of the lower bouts AND the 'f's don't exactly scream Prescott to me either.

BG
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Old 01-28-2007, 11:19 PM
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Lightbulb Prescott features..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Glassman View Post
Yeah, when I look at the retored bass by Lou DiLeone the shape of the lower bouts AND the 'f's don't exactly scream Prescott to me either.

BG
To me, it's not so much the shape as it is the FF cuts and Scroll. Like Jeff Bollbach has preached to me, each person makes a curve his own way. In the case with hand made instruments, you can see if it's the same guy or not. With shop or production instruments, you cannot. In the case of Prescott having his own design with several workers over a 30 year period making Basses in two cities and at least 4 shops, you will see variation but not one that looks like a completely different maker or style. I have seen only two FF patterns used on Prescott Basses and only one Scroll design. The measurements vary from period to period but the 'idea' does not. With the FFs, only a few of the full sized Cello model Basses have that sweeping 'S' design as seen in his earlier Cellos (Church Basses). According to the records I have I don't see that he made that many Double Basses prior 1829 or in his first decade of making them. Mainly what we see are the Church Basses. After the move to Concord and the expansion of the shop, we see even the Cellos (Church Basses) using the short wide FFs that are on almost 98% of the Basses he made. When you see an old Yankee Bass and the FFs are not Prescott, that's usually a 'smoking gun' right there. Many old Basses have had their Necks/Scrolls replaced as until recent years, not everyone considered an original Bass Scroll of value or worth saving with a grafted neck. I understand Prescott farmed out his Scroll work at some point. This would mean that each time the model was made for duplicating, slight variations could occur as they could with final sanding and hand shaping. My Prescott (now sold) had a beautiful Scroll with soft lines. Some are more box-like in their finished state but some not. In either case, you can always tell it's a Prescott. Similar looking long Scrolls with extra turns or similar pegbox lines are just 'Prescott School' model Basses.

I bet that if my Batchelder did not have a label, it would be called a Prescott by just about any of the Dealers currently throwing his name around casually as we have seen to date. For lack of a better name, it is easier to call anything close to Prescott a Prescott. The only problem is that it's not close to my eye having studied his Basses over the last few years mainly for personal interest. So far, two Basses called Prescott and owned by famous players are just not a Prescott to me eye.
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Old 03-02-2007, 09:49 PM
Don Carrigan Don Carrigan is offline
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Default Dating Early Prescotts

DATING PRESCOTTS:
We know that in 1822 Abraham Prescott travelled (by c**** & Hudson?) to the annual "Mechanics Exhibit" to show of his new DOUBLE BASS. He built his FIRST DOUBLE BASS IN 1819. Then one a year until 1822. The newspapers in New York made a fool of him, saying his double bass was 'UNPLAYABLE' because the shoulders were rediculously wide! He had "projected" the measurements directly from 'cello measurements!
With his tail between his legs he quickly beat a path back to Dearfield, N.H. and instantly cut down (narrowed) the shoulders of every bass in his shop and perhaps others he might contact. Remember, these basses were sold to accompany choirs. One didn't have to play like Koussavitsky to play roots and fifths on a 3 string bass.
But dating his DOUBLE basses is easy for examples PIROR to 1824. He, himself, carved his earliest scrolls from soft sycamore wood with an open back string box and "teeth marks" at bottom rear. Here's my 1820 Prescott Busetto (now 5 string neck) showing pre 1823 carving: http://home.earthlink.net/~prescottv...StrBoxRear.jpg
http://home.earthlink.net/~prescottv...5StrScroll.jpg
In addition, Prescott's earliest basses sported FF holes ONE INCH WIDE!!! and, if you include the triangular notches, ONE INCH AND A QUARTER WIDE!!! The largest FF holes what am, ever. He only made a few of the provable early basses.
http://home.earthlink.net/~prescottv...06Prescott.jpg
By 1830, increasing business demanded that Prescott hire apprentices, some of whom quickly changed designs to personal tastes. Many later walked away to start their own shops, especially after two shop fires.
Prescott numbers may be misleading inasmuch as he simply numbered instruments consequtively, whether 'cellos, church basses, double basses and even one or two violas and a single violin. We have to guess.
See my photos and data at http://home.earthlink.net/~prescott
Front: http://home.earthlink.net/~prescottv...5strgFRONT.jpg
Angle: http://home.earthlink.net/~prescottv...strgANGLED.jpg
http://home.earthlink.net/~prescottv...SCROLLSIDE.jpg
http://home.earthlink.net/~prescottv...TTdonSMALL.jpg
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Old 04-06-2007, 01:33 PM
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Ken Smith Ken Smith is offline
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Lightbulb Message from Don..

It's getting harder to maintain this List of Purported Prescott Bass Locations, but here's my latest data. Click here below:

http://home.earthlink.net/~prescottviol/data/LOCATIONSPrescott07APRIL5.txt


I let Don know that my c.1820 Prez is now in the Columbus Symphony but I still have the Prescott School/relative Batchelder Bass.
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Old 06-07-2007, 02:15 AM
Brian Glassman Brian Glassman is offline
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Default The "Arvel Shaw" Prescott

Barrie has the Arvel Shaw Prescott up for sale.

There are nice pics here: http://kolstein.cybrhost.com/mm5/mer...gory_Code=bass
BG
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Old 06-07-2007, 10:50 PM
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Ken Smith Ken Smith is offline
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Lightbulb Prescott?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Glassman View Post
Barrie has the Arvel Shaw Prescott up for sale.

There are nice pics here: http://kolstein.cybrhost.com/mm5/mer...gory_Code=bass

BG
Why do you believe that to be a Prescott? The FFs and Scroll are different than all the other Prescotts we have seen. Maybe it's another Yankee maker but I don't buy every old Yankee being a Prescott because someone claims it to be!
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Old 06-13-2007, 02:01 AM
Brian Glassman Brian Glassman is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Smith View Post
I don't buy every old Yankee being a Prescott because someone claims it to be!
I agree, however I have seen some longer swooping f's like these on a lighter colored, very large 'Prescott' that I believe is on Barrie's pay to veiw site. Also similar f's on some Prescott church basses. AND the cello shaped one sold at Hammond Ashley's. We've also talked about the possibility that Abe and the boys probably used different scrolls from dif. suppliers thru the decades.
Also on the Arvel Shaw bass, look at the outer linings on the ribs and along the side of the neck joint, as well as the flamed rock maple back and compare it to this bass at Nahrmann's : http://www.nahrmannbass.com/cgi-bin/...rd&UsedID=0003

pretty similar.

BG
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